Trinity Mount Ministries

Showing posts with label child trafficking. Show all posts
Showing posts with label child trafficking. Show all posts

Monday, September 21, 2020

35 missing teens recovered in Ohio, U.S. Marshals say


Authorities have recovered 35 missing Ohio teenagers in the northeastern part of the state as part of a joint law enforcement operation, according to KTLA sister station WJW in Cleveland.
The missing and endangered children were between the ages of 13 and 18, and just over 20% of them were tied to human trafficking, according to the U.S. Marshals Service.
In a news release, officials said only five cases that were referred to the Marshals Task Force remain open.
The United States Marshal for the Northern District of Ohio has created a permanent Missing Child Unit based on the results of Operation Safety Net, an effort that included local and federal law enforcement, the press release states.



The missing children were recovered in Cleveland, Euclid, Akron, Mansfield, Columbus, and Miami, Florida.
The Cleveland Division of Police, East Cleveland Police Department, the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Office, and Newburgh Heights Police Department assisted with the operation.

Anyone with tips about missing children can call the tip line at 1-866-492-6833.






Monday, September 7, 2020

‘Operation Homecoming’: Eight missing children recovered in Indiana, total of 72 children found in federal sweeps

Federal officials have recovered eight missing children through Operation Homecoming. (usmarshals.gov)

By: Natalie Dreier, Cox Media Group National Content Desk
INDIANAPOLIS — Eight more missing children have been found as part of “Operation Homecoming,” officials with the U.S. Marshals Service announced.
The federal law enforcement officers searched for the children from Aug. 31 through Sept. 4 as part of a multiagency operation in the Indianapolis area, the Marshals said in a news release.
The children, who were between the ages of 6 and 17, were given to the Indiana Department of Child Services.
Over recent weeks, there have been operations under different names recovering missing children across the country.
“Operation Not Forgotten” saved 26 children and found the location of 13 others, bringing that total to 39.
“Operation Safety Net” found 25 missing and endangered children in Ohio over 20 days, CBS News reported.
Among the three operations, 72 children have been recovered over recent weeks.

Thursday, August 27, 2020

Child Trafficking: Myth vs. Fact


Trafficking, according to the United Nations, involves three main elements[ii]:
  • The act: Recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring, or receipt of persons.
  • The means: Threat or use of force, coercion, abduction, fraud, deception, abuse of power or vulnerability, or giving payments or benefits to a person in control of the victim.
  • The purpose: For the purpose of exploitation, which includes exploiting the prostitution of others, sexual exploitation, forced labor, slavery or similar practices and the removal of organs.
There is much misinformation about what trafficking is, who is affected and what it means for a child to be trafficked. Read on to learn more about the myths vs. facts of child trafficking.
MYTH: Traffickers target victims they don’t know
FACT: A majority of the time, victims are trafficked by someone they know, such as a friend, family member or romantic partner.
MYTH: Only girls and women are victims of human trafficking
FACT: Boys and men are just as likely to be victims of human trafficking as girls and women. However, they are less likely to be identified and reported. Girls and boys are often subject to different types of trafficking, for instance, girls may be trafficked for forced marriage and sexual exploitation, while boys may be trafficked for forced labor or recruitment into armed groups.
MYTH: All human trafficking involves sex or prostitution
FACT: Human trafficking can include forced labor, domestic servitude, organ trafficking, debt bondage, recruitment of children as child soldiers, and/or sex trafficking and forced prostitution.  
MYTH: Trafficking involves traveling, transporting or moving a person across borders
FACT: Human trafficking is not the same thing as smuggling, which are two terms that are commonly confused. Trafficking does not require movement across borders. In fact, in some cases, a child could be trafficked and exploited from their own home. In the U.S., trafficking most frequently occurs at hotels, motels, truck stops and online.
MYTH: People being trafficked are physically unable to leave or held against their will
FACT: Trafficking can involve force, but people can also be trafficked through threats, coercion, or deception. People in trafficking situations  can be controlled through drug addiction, violent relationships, manipulation, lack of financial independence, or  isolation from family or friends, in addition to physical restraint or harm.
MYTH: Trafficking primarily occurs in developing countries
FACT: Trafficking occurs all over the world, though the most common forms of trafficking can differ by country.  The United States is one of the most active sex trafficking countries in the world, where exploitation of trafficking victims occurs in cities, suburban and rural areas. Labor trafficking occurs in the U.S., but at lower rates than most developing countries.
If you suspect someone is a victim of trafficking, contact the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-800-373-7888. The confidential hotline is open 24 hours a day, every day, and helps identify, protect and serve victims of trafficking.
Sources:
[i] Give Her a Choice: Building A Better Future For Girls (Save the Children) 

Friday, June 15, 2018

Chilling NCMEC Report Shows 88% of Missing Sex Trafficked Kids Come from US Foster Care



America has a dark secret that no one wants to admit. Talk of this secret will get you labelled as a conspiracy theorist, fake news, and outlets who report on it will have their organic reach throttled by social media and Google alike. Despite the overwhelming evidence to the contrary, many in the mainstream media and the government refuse to see this very real epidemic of child sex trafficking in the United States. What’s more, according to the government’s own data, the vast majority of a portion of these trafficked kids are coming from the country’s own foster care system.

Children are being needlessly ripped from homes at such an alarming rate that hundreds of parents in one state have gone so far as to create a counter-kidnapping organization to stop it.
As TFTP reported last week, a parent’s rights organization filed a letter in federal court last Tuesday asking a federal judge strike down Minnesota’s current child protection laws for being too expansive and removing children from loving and safe homes without due process.
“Families are being abused, and in some cases, destroyed, as a result of laws that are inappropriate,” said Dwight Mitchell, the lead plaintiff in the case and founder of the parents’ association. “This is legal kidnapping.”
This legal kidnapping is happening in states across the country and it is contributing to the very real epidemic of child trafficking. The reality of such practices within the United States foster system is outright horrifying.
In 1984, the United States Congress established the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), and, as part of Missing Children’s Assistance Reauthorization Act of 2013 they receive $40 million to study and track missing and trafficked children in the United States.
In 2017, NCMEC assisted law enforcement with over 27,000 cases of missing children, the majority who were considered endangered runaways.
According to their most recent report complied from FBI data and their own, of the nearly 25,000 runaways reported to NCMEC in 2017, one in seven were likely victims of child sex trafficking. Of those, 88 percent were in the care of social services when they went missing.
Showing the scope of the abuse, in 2017 alone, NCMEC’s CyberTipline, a national mechanism for the public and electronic service providers to report instances of suspected child sexual exploitation, received over 10 million reports. According to NCMEC, most of these tips were related to the following:
  • Apparent child sexual abuse images.
  • Online enticement, including “sextortion.”
  • Child sex trafficking.
  • Child sexual molestation.
Other governmental organizations have corroborated this horrifying trend. In a 2013 FBI 70-city nationwide raid, 60 percent of the victims came from foster care or group homes. In 2014, New York authorities estimated that 85 percent of sex trafficking victims were previously in the child welfare system. In 2012, Connecticut police rescued 88 children from sex trafficking; 86 were from the child welfare system. 
Equally as disturbing as the fact that most sex trafficked kids come from within the system is the fact that the FBI discovered in a 2014 nationwide raid that many foster children rescued from sex traffickers, including children as young as 11, were never reported missing by child welfare authorities.
Last year, TFTP reported on an example of this lack of reporting out of Topeka, Kansas. In the shocking report, the Kansas Department for Children and Families (DCF), which oversees foster care in the state, were found to have lost 70 children after a high profile case of three missing sisters garnered the attention of authorities.
This has to stop.
It should be noted that there are certainly instances of abusive parents who should not have custody of their children. There are also many kind and loving foster parents willing to take them in. However, as the recent case in Minnesota highlights, many times, these children are torn from loving homes and forced into a system rife with abuse and trafficking.
One terrifying example of kids being unnecessarily taken from their parents by the state only to be severely harmed in government custody comes out of Arizona, the state kidnapped a 5-year-old girl from her mother who had an alleged substance abuse problem and put her directly into the hands of a leader of a child sex ring.
Even after the girl’s mother recovered from her addiction, the state refused to return her daughter. Even worse, the mother found out that her daughter was being repeatedlysexually abused and no action was taken to remove her daughter from the state’s system.
Sadly, children all over the US are taken from caring parents who have admitted to using marijuana or other drugs. While there’s no national count on how many parents lose custody of their kids each year due to marijuana, Keith Stroup, founder of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) told The Daily Chronic that his team gets calls “three or four times a week from people who have lost custody of their children because they tested positive at birth or in a situation where parents are feuding over custody.” This kidnapping even occurs in regions where marijuana is legal.
Even high-level government officials have been ensnared in these foster care abuse scandals. As TFTP previously reported, multiple victims came forward and accused Seattle Mayor Ed Murray of sexually abusing them when they were children in Washington’s foster care system.
The records in that case, dating back to 1984, explicitly noted that Ed Murray should “never again be utilized as a certified CSD resource for children.” It also showed that a criminal case was brought against Murray by prosecutors but in spite of the multiple accusations, charges were somehow never filed and his records buried.
As Snopes and the mainstream media in general attempts to smear those who try to call attention to alleged and very real child trafficking, the government’s own data shows how irresponsible this is. While there are certainly some outlandish theories being presented online, the facts are outlandish enough to warrant serious scrutiny. Until this epidemic is taken seriously, the government, the media, and all those who deny it will remain complicit in keeping it going.
As Michael Dolce, who specializes in these horrific child abuse cases, pointed outearlier this year, “we have set up a system to sex traffic American children.” Indeed we have.

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Chinese who buy children to be prosecuted:


BEIJING: Buyers of abducted children in China will face criminal punishment under proposed laws that would remove an exemption from prosecution, reports said Thursday, as authorities clamp down on the flourishing child trafficking industry.
More than 13,000 children were rescued by police in China last year, the China Daily said, with demand for stolen youngsters fuelled by a traditional preference for sons and a one-child limit for some couples.
Current law imposes harsh sentences for child trafficking, including the death penalty in certain cases.
Buyers of kidnapped children can be sentenced to up to three years in jail, but are exempt from criminal proceedings if they have not abused the children or obstructed efforts to rescue them.
The revised criminal law will eliminate the exception and "increase penalties for those who buy children", the state-run newspaper said, without specifying potential sentences.
"Buyers would receive a less severe penalty if they did not abuse the child or attempt to hinder rescue efforts," it added.
The revised law was welcomed by Feng Jianlin, a father from Shanxiprovince in northern China whose daughter was kidnapped in 2008 when she was nine.
"I think those who buy children should be punished, and the proposed law will promote China's anti-baby trafficking campaign," said Feng, who has set up an information-sharing website which has seen 14 children reunited with their biological parents.
"Currently people do not break the law if they buy children, so the trafficking business is rampant in China," he told AFP.
Parents of missing children commonly use the Internet to search for their offspring, and thousands have posted photos of babies and toddlers on website Baby Come Home, as well as sharing information on Feng's website.
Child trafficking has grown into a huge problem in China, where this year alone police have broken up criminal gangs found keeping babies in disused mortuaries and confining pregnant women to factories before selling their newborns.
Earlier this year, a Chinese mother in the central province of Henan was charged with human trafficking for allegedly conspiring with a doctor to sell her baby boy for almost $7,000.
In 2013 several families in Shaanxi province accused a doctor of persuading them to give up their children shortly after birth, allegations that led to a number of local officials being sacked.
Almost 13,000 people involved in human trafficking were punished between 2010 and last year, the China Daily said, citing the Supreme People's Court.
More than half of those convicted received sentences ranging from five years in prison to death.
The new criminal law was submitted Wednesday to the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, China's rubber-stamp parliament.
Other revisions include harsher punishments for those involved in "cults or superstitious activities", and widening the list of activities which can be defined as "terrorism", state news agency Xinhuasaid.
China has previously cracked down harshly on groups it labels "cults", most notably the Falungong spiritual movement, which was banned in the late 1990s.
More recently the outlawed "Quannengshen" - which can be translated as the Church of Almighty God - has been targeted.
A father and daughter who belonged to Quannengshen were executed in February, having been convicted of beating a woman to death at a McDonald's restaurant, reportedly after she rebuffed their attempts to recruit her.
China has also rolled out tough measures to confront what it labels "terrorism" in the largely Muslim region of Xinjiang, sentencing to death scores of people while hundreds have been jailed or detained.

 http://www.TrinityMount.Info